Sunday, 31 July 2011

Morning Vinyasa Krama Tadasana sequence at the hotel.

A shortened Tadasana / On your feet sequence this morning at the hotel in S. Wales, where I've been all week reviewing Ramaswami's sequences. This is pretty much how I practice it most mornings, give or take a couple of hand/arm variations. I tend to include it in my morning practice no matter what I'm practicing whether it's a straight, VK sequence, a mixture of subroutines or even Ashtanga. In the case of Ashtanga I'll do this routine as soon as I get on the mat before staring the Sury's.

Apologies for the sound, the battery was running low and there's a point eleven minutes in where it just stops altogether, had to give it a couple of minutes charge before carrying on.

After this tadasana sequence I went on to a couple of triangle variations and then into the Meditative sequence where I caught my heels in kapotasana for the first time in three months or so. Not exactly sure what made the difference but in Bow sequence yesterday I just flew up into Viparita Salabhasana, quite surprised me. think that gave me the confidence to go for the deeper kapo this morning

20 comments:

  1. I am pretty sure Tadasana sequence is my favorite and it always seems like one of the most important.

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  2. One of the great things about ashtanga is that you always no where you are from the moment you step on the mat. I find tadasana works in a similar way because no matter which sequence I'm going to be doing I always start the same, ten minutes of this, five minutes of sury namaskara's, by then your settled anyway. I like too that you can adapt it as prep for the sequence you'll be working on. Here I'm milking the backbends because I know I'll be practicing the meditative sequence with it's backbend focus. If I was going to practice seated I'd milk the forward bending in tadasana and do more of those variations or more of the twists as prep for asymmetric.

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  3. hm. you breathe s l o w. Very nice. It is inspiring me to go even slower at the suryas, really working at linking that breath to the full curve of the movement

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  4. i am teaching yoga and this sequence as well. my students have all benefited greatly from this excellent opening to a complete vinyasa practice. It truly draws the practicioner in an is wondorous for coordinating breath with movement. I have only recently been able to start practicing this sequence after my hip injury. Sometimes I am convinced that I could leave the mat after this practice and feel energized and sattvic. Nice to see someone else doing it

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  5. Long, slow and steady, quite intense too, can generate some heat with the ujaii, find it an intense and powerful practice despite looking so slow.Tried breathing this slow in Ashtanga but not sure it works. Nice to alternate the pace in Ashtanga though, slow down the paschi say, the janu's, speed up through the marichi's to get some sweat going for Kurmasana and garbha P then slow it down againwhen you get to the Supta hasta Padangusthasana and the leg movements.

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  6. Glad your hip is clearing up Wyatt ( didn't you fall off a bike or something). i agree sometimes it feels enough. On my 'rest' day I tend to do this, the paschi and inversions and move right on to pranayama.

    not sure you can see the movement around the hips in this video the lifting up of the hips as you begin to stretch up and then almost lifting out of your pelvis on that final stretch after linking the fingers. Then trying to hold onto that raised hip position throughout, tweaking it a little more each posture, that was a revelation to me on the course, especially when you carry it on through Dandasana and the seated postures. Gotta love the krama.

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  7. I'm pretty sure Tadasana sequence will be my favourite :) Just received Ramaswami's Complete Book today, can't wait to read it - and your posts are so on time!!

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  8. I dedicated my morning practice today to really slow breathing as posted, I cannot say I was in hurry before, but this was something special, felt the heat as well, it was hard at the same time, need some time to get accustomed to (need to extend later, it was like 6-7 sec per inhale and per exhale).

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  9. I agree completely = Tadasana Sequence is my happy place! I feel it is a magical gift, passed down to us by Ramaswami, and the fact that it can be done by (almost) anyone anywhere (you don't even need a mat!) places it in a high and honorable place in my practice and teachings. I also think it embodies the shift in Krishnamacharya's teachings to start a practice with the tadasana sequence (vs. the surya namaskaras as the ashtanga sequence begins with) because it gives you the proper warm-up physically, breath-wise, and mentally. Like Tony was saying, the fact that you always know where you are in the Tadasana Sequence allows the mind to relax and focus on the breath, setting the tone for your whole practice!

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  10. Surprising isn't it K, often looks like such a soft practice there on the page. I remember Ramaswami turned us all to jelly after the 'On one leg' and triangle sequences'. Loved the tadasana in the video, more space and light than my home practice room that whole arm lifting thing was much more...jubilant. the longer slower breaths will come, no rush just enjoy it.

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  11. Rennie hi : ) Yes, yes and yes and isn't it the easiest way to get on the mat in the morning. Interesting thought about it revealing a shift in K's teaching, Sury's are quite a full on way to start a practice. Kino was saying in her video that even experienced Ashtangi's should take the first ones easy, stepping back rather than jumping back. lovely to see your name come up in my comment box.

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  12. Tadasana is the pulse that draws one in. it is about the posture as well the movement/breathing as being something more than the sum of its parts ... VK is truly healing me and all others with whom I share it thanks for the offer

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  13. Much gratitude for sharing. An invaluable practice aid .-s

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  14. Practice with you everyday! Very grateful for this resource; question-do you do an opening chant? and wondering if you would share that?

    Wondering if there is a translation available for the chant in Krishnamacharya's Yoga Makaranda (maybe this is Tamil?) starting "Jivamani Bhrajatphana sahasra...." pg 25

    Thankyou again. sharon

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  15. sharon, I'm also interested in Grimmly's answer,
    as for myself, I open every time with "Jivamani..."

    Here is a translation for the Ananta Mantra
    http://www.ashtangayoga.info/philosophy/mantra/nagarajaya-namah/

    Actually what I'm interested in is that this site says:
    "Krishnamacharya provided each of his students with their own personal mantra to be used before the start of each practice.",
    so what was the mantra Krishnamacharya gave to Ramaswami?

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  16. GRIMMLY: Hi Sharon, thank you for commenting.
    I'm in the library trying to catch up on comments and it wont let me comment as me, having to do it as annon for some reason.

    I do uses a chant to start practice, it's the patanjali chant but Ramaswami has an extra bit in Tamil at the beginning. love this chant was humming it all day the first time I heard it. I will fish it out and do a post with links and versions of it over the next couple of days.

    I also use the Pranayama chant during pranayama and finish practice with a peace chant.

    Will check out the Krishnamacharya one you mention when i get home if I can't find it I'll ask Ramaswami about it.

    More soon on this, promise.

    Ramaswami gave us a meditation mantra. your not supposed to say what it is but there are five similar one's i'll fish those out later too, post them and you can choose one for meditation with the mala if you like.

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  17. In 30 years of yoga practice never received a personal mantra; have always missed this, but just never felt comfortable about approaching a teacher about this. (classes usually so large teacher would not even know me).

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  18. Hi Sharon. We were just given a mantra as a class to work with for the mantra portion of the course, not exactly personal as in whispered in the right ear etc. That said it was still given to us by Ramaswami and feels a little special.

    Hope to have the chant post up tomorrow.

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  19. Thanks! now that I'm getting older and a bit creaky seems mantra and meditation are moving into forefront of practice. (as Ramaswami mentions in The Three Stages of Life). Didn't quite believe him 'til hit my 60's and as always he is right on.-s

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